Heather Horton

XTERRA Pan Am Tour Champions

Amateur racers from Canada, Argentina, Brazil, New Zealand and all over the U.S. captured inaugural XTERRA Pan America Tour titles on Saturday.

The 10-stop series for amateurs started back on March 20th at XTERRA Costa Rica and concluded at the XTERRA Pan American Championship in Utah.

Amateurs competing in the Tour counted their best four scores from the first nine events plus whatever they got, or didn’t get, at the XTERRA Pan American Championship. In addition, amateur athletes needed to race at least two (any two) XTERRA Pan American Tour majors to qualify for Tour honors.

Heather Horton (pictured above) led all racers with 440 points en route to winning the 15-19 division. Horton won her division at four races (two in Canada, two in the U.S.) and was second at the Pan Am Champs on Saturday.

Luiz Escudero from Brazil was one of the most well-traveled racers, winning 50-54 division titles at XTERRA Dominican Republic, XTERRA Argentina, XTERRA Brazil, and taking second-place at XTERRA Mexico and the Pan Am Champs in Utah for a total of 365 Points.

Here is a look at all of this year’s amateur XTERRA Pan America Tour Champions:

WOMEN
Division – Name – Hometown
F15-19 – Heather Horton – Sandy, UT, USA
F25-29 – Heather Wilson – Temecula, CA, USA
F30-34 – Megan Riepma – Lafayette, CO, USA
F35-39 – Whitney Barrett – Golden, CO, USA
F40-44 – Deanna McCurdy – Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
F45-49 – Julie Robb – North Vancouver, Canada
F50-54 – Margo Pitts – Raleigh, NC, USA
F55-59 – Tamara Tabeek – Ramona, CA, USA
F60-64 – Martha Buttner – Boulder, CO, USA
F65-69 – Libby Harrow – Fruita, CO, USA

MEN
Division – Name – Hometown
M15-19 – Lewis Ryan – Rotorua, New Zealand
M20-24 – Nelson Hegg – Boulder, CO, USA
M25-29 – Alfredo Valdes – Corona, CA, USA
M30-34 – Gaston Fischer – Bariloche, Argentina
M35-39 – Andrew Knutsen – Lakewood, CO, USA
M40-44 – Garren Watkins – Boulder, CO, USA
M45-49 – Joost Van Ulden – North Vancouver, Canada
M50-54 – Luiz Escudero – Sao Paulo, Brazil
M55-59 – Cliff Millemann – Davis, CA, USA
M60-64 – Steve Cole – Alpharetta, GA, USA
M65-69 – David Rakita – Durango, CO, USA
PC – Craig Vogstberger – Highlands Ranch, CO, USA

Middaugh, Snyder

Golden Week for XTERRA Greats

There was something sweet in the air this week on the XTERRA Planet.

While much of the XTERRA Tribe gathered in Ogden, Utah for the inaugural XTERRA Pan America Championship two of our sports biggest’ stars were making dreams come true all on their own.

In Mexico, Flora Duffy upset gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen to win the season-finale in Cozumel and the ITU World Triathlon Series Championship.

In Brazil, Jamie “J-Dawg” Whitmore won the women’s C1-3 road race Rio Paralympics Gold medal to compliment the Silver she captured at the C1-2-3 3,000-meter individual pursuit earlier in the week.

In Utah, Suzie Snyder captured the inaugural XTERRA Pan American Championship race and Pan America Tour titles, walking away with her single biggest payday after 12 years of racing XTERRA.

And perhaps just as exciting for the XTERRA Tribe was seeing last year’s USA Champ Emma Garrard at the race on Saturday – not in spandex – but with a bulging belly signaling her second child is coming soon.

Then on the men’s side we witnessed one of the greatest spectacles in all of sports as Josiah Middaugh and Braden Currie fought to a photo-finish that was so good it made ESPN SportsCenter’s Top Plays.

The mild-mannered Middaugh took home the race and the Pan America Tour title with that last lunge to the finish.

Now we start building towards Maui, and off-road triathlon’s greatest day.  It’s just a little more than one-month away on October 23, and rest assured more dreams will be coming true…

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Mr. XTERRA 2016, Marcus Barton

Mr. XTERRA 2016, Marcus Barton

On Saturday night in Ogden, Utah Marcus Barton was named the 2016 Mr. XTERRA award winner.

The perpetual honor is given annually to recognize a member of the XTERRA Tribe that exemplifies the spirit of XTERRA – the challenge, commitment and camaraderie that is the essence of our sport.

It is a prestigious club, filled with men and women who have made XTERRA what it is today, and Marcus is clearly a worthy inductee.

This season he was the first racer to score the max amount of 325 points in the XTERRA America Tour, and he was first in his division at all seven races he competed at during the regular season.  He is also the first car you’ll see in the parking lot on race morning, the first man into transition, and the first guy to offer to help zip up your wetsuit.

“He’s incredibly deserving of Mr. XTERRA,” said training buddy and XTERRA Pan Am 50-54 division champion Margo Pitts.  “He is passionate about XTERRA and shares his love with others, he is caring and helpful, a great leader and planner, and is super detail oriented.  I love trying to beat him to transition on race morning but that hasn’t happened yet :)”

Indeed, Barton races XTERRA with the same kind of precision he perfected while serving our country in the United States Air Force.

The 46-year-old computer whiz from North Carolina has been racing XTERRA since 2007, and did his first one on a $50 Mongoose he bought at a garage sale.  He started to get really fast in 2012 when he won the first of five straight regional championship titles, and has won an impressive 25 races in his division during that stretch.

All that said, Barton didn’t receive the Mr. XTERRA award because he’s fast.  He won it because he’s kind, friendly, helpful, and has lured a ton of people into racing XTERRA.

“Marcus is one of those people who always loves racing no matter what the conditions are,” said Caleb Baity, 20-24 Southeast Region Champ.  “He is a super fun and energetic person no matter if it is race day or if we are just going out training for the day.  He invests lots of time training and will drive hours during the day just to get a single short ride in because it is “similar” to an upcoming race course.”

Baity met Barton when he was leading a “how-to” transition clinic before XTERRA Whitewater last year, and said, “after meeting him at the transition clinic he has been a wonderful mentor helping me progress in every single aspect of the sport and I have come long strides from how I used to be.  He is always willing to help anyone in need and give advice where he can.”

And Barton gives out great advice. Someone posted a note to the XTERRA Facebook page earlier this year that asked if “there someone I can talk to for advice on my first-time XTERRA?”

She wanted to know what was the best course for a rookie, with easy travel, and warm water.  We immediately forwarded her note to Marcus, and in a matter of minutes he broke down every course in five states, five ways to Sunday for her.

Barton is also a fantastic writer, a gifted story teller, and he recounts races in vivid detail on his blog at speedylizard.com.  What makes his XTERRA stories so good is how he tells you how everyone else did, and is so quick to spread the praise around to his fellow athletes.  He even started a Facebook group for XTERRA Southeast Region athletes and has been a catalyst for that community, organizing group rides and runs and socials everywhere he goes.

More than just words, Barton is a man of action and integrity.  A few years back there was an XTERRA race held in really muddy conditions.  While the course wasn’t in great shape before the event, it was pretty worked over after the event.  So, even though he lived hours away, he organized a work crew to help repair it, and he gave up a weekend of XTERRA racing to go clean it up.

For all these reasons and many more, it’s our pleasure to welcome Marcus Barton to the club, as this year’s Mr. XTERRA Award Winner.

Tribute Video

ALL-TIME MR. AND MRS. XTERRA AWARD WINNERS

2016 – Marcus Barton

2015 – Janet Soule and Cliff Millemann

2014 – Craig Vogstberger

2013 – Brent Bieshaar

2012 – Jay Heller

2011 – Steve Cole

2010 – Casey Fannin

2009 – Brandyn Roark

2008 – Circ and Cindi Toepel

2007 – Will Kelsay

2006 – Courtney Cardenas

2005 – Tom Lyons

2004 – Anthony Snoble and Rick Byman

2003 – Billy Anderson and Barbara Peterson

2002 – Susi Chandler

2001 – Chris Shelley

2000 – Robert Hopper

1999 – Dennis Fox

 

Middaugh Horse

Middaugh Coaching Corner – A Horse for Every Course

The Maui hills are steep and sustained.  Some may say there are “different horses for different courses,” meaning that some athletes may perform better on a flatter course and another athlete may have the advantage on long, sustained climbs.  But what if you want to be that horse on all courses?

Biking and running uphill depends a lot on your aerobic capacity relative to your body weight.  For cyclists, the discriminating factor for performance is watts per kilogram and for runners it is the relative VO2 max expressed in milliliters per kilogram body mass per minute.  Regardless, it is a pretty simple equation with the rate of work (Power or VO2 max) as the numerator and your body mass as the denominator.

As the key race of the season approaches all athletes want to buckle down, dot their I’s and cross their T’s.  Some self-destructive athletes (myself included) want to train harder, longer, and oh yeah—lose that last 5 lbs.  Achieving all three is problematic. Let me give you an example.

There was a study done a few years ago with three groups of well-trained cyclists.  The first group maintained their normal training volume with no high intensity and followed a low calorie diet.  The second group increased training intensity with high intensity intervals, and did not alter their diet.  The third group did both—increased training intensity and restricted their caloric intake.  Interestingly, the first two groups both increased watts per kilogram but by different methods.  In the first group, watts were unchanged, but body mass had decreased.  The second group increased power output (watts), but body mass stayed the same.  However, the third group actually decreased their watts per kilogram and therefore performance.  Although their body mass was down, their power output plummeted.  They were not able to recover from their workouts and were stuck in a downward spiral, bleeding more watts than the weight loss could make up for.

A word you may have seen in some of our previous articles is maladaptation.  Maladaptation occurs when the stimulus is too strong, too closely spaced, and recovery is inadequate.  Instead of improving performance from training, performance deteriorates.  This is likely to happen if you jump up your training load by a large percentage and then drop caloric intake to very low levels.  The body’s response is an increase in stress hormones, which puts your body in a catabolic state and lowers your immune system.

The take home message is that you need to be smart and practical with how much change you are going to make to either your training program or your diet.  If you plan to bring in more high intensity training, consider backing off a little on the volume to keep your training load in check.  Don’t go extreme with your diet, but make small changes that don’t leave you in a catabolic state and exhausted.

For my final Maui prep, I focus on bringing up the intensity on key workouts, but also backing off more between for proper recovery, and I begin to polarize my training more than other times of the year.  As far as nutrition, I do tighten the screws just a tad, but I double down on my recovery nutrition and the nutrition surrounding my workouts.  I attempt to cut out some of the garbage in my diet with a few simple food rules.  Some of them have to do with specific foods, but most of it is about behavior change, such as sitting down to eat—no eating while standing up, watching TV, or driving.  Usually this results in just a couple pounds of weight loss over the course of 4-6 weeks, while power numbers continue to rise.

Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Don’t skimp on nutrition before, during, or after exercise.
  2. The quality of your high intensity workouts is most important so don’t begin a session compromised with fatigue or lack of fuel.
  3. Polarize your training sessions more than any other part of the season. Adequately space hard sessions and take easy days a little shorter and/or easier.
  4. Set some simple food rules that are specific to you and easy to achieve. If you have a vice such as soda or snacking on your kids lunch items, cut it out.

Food rules

  1. Weight your calories earlier in the day. Eat a solid breakfast including plenty of low glycemic carbohydrate to fuel your high intensity training.
  2. Nutrient dense foods only around your training (sports drink, gels, recovery drink)
  3. Limit liquid calories outside of exercise (excluding sports drink, recovery drink)
  4. Focus on nutrient dense foods for your main meals, primarily in the evening
  5. Eat foods with high water and fiber content such as fruits, steamed vegetables, salads so you still feel full and eat a similar volume/weight of food. To have a little portion control at dinnertime, try this– eat an apple, drink a glass of water, eat a salad with oil/vinegar dressing and then go for the main course.
  6. No eating past 8:00pm

Josiah Middaugh just won the inaugural XTERRA Pan American Championship and is the reigning XTERRA World Champion. He has a master’s degree in kinesiology and has been a certified personal trainer for 15 years (NSCA-CSCS). His brother Yaro also has a master’s degree and has been an active USAT certified coach for a decade. Read past training articles at http://www.xterraplanet.com/training/middaugh-coaching-corner and learn more about their coaching programs at www.middaughcoaching.com.

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Smyth, Stephen win Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run Nationals

Photo Gallery

September 18, 2016 (Ogden, Utah) – Patrick Smyth of Santa Fe, New Mexico and Liz Stephen from Park City, Utah defended their Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Championship half-marathon titles on a picture-perfect day for running up and around Snowbasin Resort this morning.

Smyth clocked in at 1:14:48 (5:42 pace), nearly five minutes ahead of runner-up Anthony Costales of Salt Lake City.  Stephen ran it in 1:31:08, more than eight minutes ahead of Ogden’s Amber Schultz.

It’s the third national title for Smyth and the fourth for Stephen, who has now won three in a row.

“Winning three is great, I think Max King has five so I’m chasing that legacy and have a couple more to go,” said Smyth.  “I love it out here, and my legs were feeling pretty fresh this morning so I was able to get a good rhythm going on the climb and really fly on the downhills.   I always savor those here, certainly one of my favorite downhill stretches is Sardine Peak to the bottom.”

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Smyth had a 15-second lead on Costales and Noah Hoffman, a 2014 U.S. Olympic Ski Team member, at the one-mile mark then the course went vertical and he started pulling away and soon after he was running by himself.

“I like running alone, just me and my thoughts, no footsteps, nobody breathing hard behind me, that’s fine by me,” said Smyth.  “The trails are great; I say it every year.  It’s one of my favorite courses in the world.  The three miles from the top of Sardine to the bottom, I love that stretch.  As soon as you start descending the switchbacks you get in a special place mentally, your feet are landing in the right place, your moving quick, I think I was able to get down to some 4:50 miles.  It’s just fun and reminds you what running is all about, getting that high.”

Next up for Smyth is the New York City Marathon, where he has a goal of finishing in the top 10.  He was 8th at the Olympic trials this year, so you know it can be done.

For the women’s winner Stephen getting back on the trails by foot was a little bit of a shock to her system.

“It’s different muscles, I’m going to be sore,” said Stephen, a two-time Olympic cross country skier who returned from a three-week ski training camp in New Zealand on Thursday.

“It’s really nice to be back here in Utah, and this is such a beautiful venue, and wonderful course, it keeps me coming back.  And I really like getting the lei at the awards ceremony, I keep it in my room for weeks it smells so nice.”

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It’s the sixth time Stephen has run this course.

“I always look forward to getting up to Sardine Peak, it’s so beautiful, and you can take a quick glance down and see how far away the lodge is.  I just think trail running is great because you’re not in the road with cars, and you get to see these beautiful places.  It’s so pure.  Plus, the people here are all so relaxed and their having fun and they’re all so pumped on running.”

Stephen is chasing her third Winter Olympics (South Korea 2018) with the goal of medaling in the 4 x 5k relay, saying “It’s where all my focus is right now.”

Elite Runner Results:

Place Men Hometown Time Purse
1 Patrick Smyth Santa Fe, New Mexico 1:14:48 $1,000
2 Anthony Costales Salt Lake City, UT 1:19:30 $600
3 Ben Dickshinkski Salt Lake City, UT 1:20:25 $400
4 Travis Morrison South Salt Lake, UT 1:20:55 $300
5 David Kilgore New York, NY 1:21:05 $200
Place Women Hometown Time Purse
1 Liz Stephen Park City, UT 1:31:08 $1,000
2 Amber Schultz Ogden, UT 1:39:35 $600
3 Selina Sekulic Farmington, NM 1:40:37 $400
4 Sarah Graves Ballantine, MT 1:42:23 $300
5 Penelope Freedman Salt Lake City, UT 1:43:19 $200

Complete Results

UTAH’S TUCK WINS EIGHTH TITLE

Although the elite runners chase the overall crown at the Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Championship, the event remains an age-group race.

Twenty-five runners representing 10 different states took home age-group titles at the 2016 Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run Nationals.

The home-state Utah runners led the way with 10 champions, not including Kevin Tuck (formerly from Salt Lake City but now living in Phoenix, AZ).  Tuck, 60, was an impressive 21st overall, and this was his unprecedented eighth Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Championship age-group win.

Bob Evers (men 65-69) from Park City, Utah won his sixth straight XTERRA National title.  It was the fourth national crown for Stephen (25-29), Hans Unger (70-74) and Tamara Tabeek (55-59), who also won the XTERRA Pan America Championship off-road triathlon championship yesterday.  Donnie Gray (45-49), Patrick Smyth (30-34), and Adrian Wolford (75-79) won their third crowns, while Andy Lee (40-44) and Micala Schultz won their second.

All of the age-group champions received a free entry to participate in the 2016 Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run World Championship, which is scheduled for December 4 at Kualoa Ranch in Hawaii.

Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Champs
   
Division Name Hometown Time
10 – 14 Joseph Schultz Fort Collins, CO 3:15:20
20 – 24 Ben Dickshinkski Salt Lake City, UT 1:20:25
25 – 29 Anthony Costales Salt Lake City, UT 1:19:30
30 – 34 Patrick Smyth* (3) Santa Fe, NM 1:14:48
35 – 39 Joshua Merrick Tabernash, CO 1:31:38
40 – 44 Andy Lee (2) Lakeway, TX 1:32:02
45 – 49 Donnie Gray (3) Layton, UT 1:36:27
50 – 54 Blake Sacha Gilbert, AZ 1:46:08
55 – 59 Michael Fussell Grapevine, TX 1:47:03
60 – 64 Kevin Tuck (8) Tucson, AZ 1:37:23
65 – 69 Bob Evers (6) Park City, UT 1:54:35
70 – 74 Hans Unger (4) Sylmar, CA 2:43:44
75 – 79 Adrian Wolford (3) Mustang, OK 3:17:35
Women
   
Division Name Hometown Time
10 – 14 Hannah Lutzker Park City, UT 2:18:06
15 – 19 Micala Schultz (2) Fort Collins, CO 2:54:26
20 – 24 Molly Metivier New York, NY 1:56:28
25 – 29 Liz Stephen* (4) Park City, UT 1:31:08
30 – 34 Selina Sekulic Farmington, NM 1:40:37
35 – 39 Sarah Graves Ballantine, MT 1:42:23
40 – 44 Lizzie Brenkus Park City, UT 1:53:49
45 – 49 Anne Bonkowsky Salt Lake City, UT 2:01:49
50 – 54 Lina Haggard Salt Lake City, UT 2:21:18
55 – 59 Tamara Tabeek (4) Ramona, CA 2:12:45
60 – 64 Nicky Humphrey Reno, NV 3:19:39
65 – 69 Deborah Wagner Park City, UT 2:37:00
* TOP AMATEURS

The 2016 Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Championship  is presented the Utah Sports Commission and XTERRA TV at Amazon Video.  Sponsors include PowerBar, Muscle Milk, Outrigger Resorts, the GOAL Foundation, Gatorade Endurance, Utah Media Group, the U.S. Forest Service, Snowbasin Resort, XTERRA Fitness, Optic Nerve Sunglasses, XTERRA Travel, Greenlayer, Hub 801, and XTERRA Boards.

MIDDAUGH FINISH

Middaugh, Snyder win XTERRA Pan American Championship

Middaugh, Snyder win XTERRA Pan Am Pro Series Titles

Results | Photos

Snowbasin Resort/Ogden, UT – Josiah Middaugh out-stretched Braden Currie at the finish line to take the tape by 7/100th of a second and win the inaugural XTERRA Pan America Championship race on a beautiful day at Snowbasin Resort near Ogden, Utah this morning.  It’s the closest finish in XTERRA’s 21-year-history, 2:20:23.57 to 2:20:23.64.

In the women’s elite race Suzie Snyder came out of the water with Julie Baker, was first out of the swim-to-bike transition, took a five-minute lead onto the run and won the race in 2:51:51, exactly three minutes ahead of runner-up Lizzie Orchard of New Zealand.  With the wins both Middaugh and Snyder also secured the elite XTERRA Pan Am Pro Series titles.

“I don’t think it could have gotten any closer than that,” said Middaugh, the reigning XTERRA World Champion from Eagle-Vail, Colorado who finished 26-seconds ahead of Currie at the USA Championship held on this same course last year.

The race combined a one-mile swim in the 65-degree waters of Pineview Reservoir, an 18-mile mountain bike that climbed 3,000-feet to the top of Sardine Peak at 7,400-feet, and finished with a grueling 6-mile trail run.

Currie came out of the water with a big pack of strong swimmers led by Brad Zoller, Alex Martinek, Felipe Barraza, and Leon Griffin – took the lead early on with Leon Griffin close behind, then started to pull away from everybody but Middaugh.  Currie came into the bike-to-run transition roughly 30-seconds up on Middaugh and held the lead until the last yard of the run.

“To be honest I was coming down that hill and I had about five seconds on him when I last looked and I knew I couldn’t afford to look back and so I didn’t really know how close he was until I saw him right on my shoulder which was right on the finish,” said Currie.  “I just did everything I could, and the last thing I thought was maybe if I get something across the line before him then I would win, but obviously that wasn’t quite right.”

Middaugh was hoping it wouldn’t be that close, but in his efforts to catch Currie he crashed twice on the run.

“I was not saving anything at any time today,” said Middaugh.  “I was putting everything into the course every minute of the day and I wanted to make the catch half-way through the bike and I didn’t do that, and I didn’t make the catch at the top of the climb. I got within 30-seconds going into the run. I was like ‘okay, I got to get close in this first mile’, and I got a little bit closer and thought ‘I got to make this catch by the top of this mile’ and I didn’t make the catch.  I was like 10-15 seconds behind with 2 miles to go and that last 2 miles I kept getting within 10 seconds of Currie then I would fall, because I was just like hanging it all out there and I caught my toe on some rocks, tumbled, got back up. I fell twice and with less than a mile to go I was just 5 seconds behind and then all of a sudden I started feeling tired and wasn’t sure if I had anything left and then I started working hard again and I came in with about 5 seconds and I was like ‘okay this is it’ one last full on kick and see if it’s enough.”

It was enough, but by the slimmest of margins.

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“Obviously I came here to win and I’m absolutely gutted not to,” said Currie, who was runner-up to Middaugh at XTERRA Worlds last year as well.  “Josiah has a massive stride on him and I knew if it was going to be a downhill sprint finish with Josiah that it wouldn’t be that easy, so I was just going to try everything that I could and if my toe got across first then I’ll take that as a win.”

Interestingly, in the pictures and videos it looks as if Currie slide his leg under the finish arch and over the timing mat ahead of Middaugh, but his timing chip was on his back trailing leg which was behind Middaugh’s timing chip.

“This is the deepest field that I have ever seen at this race, it was almost like a World Championship,” said Middaugh.  “We just had strong guys and it was just hardcore racing from start to finish, I mean the swim was fast, the bike was action packed the whole way, it was just full throttle the entire race.”

Leon Griffin came home third almost four minutes back, with Felipe Barraza in fourth and Rom Akerson in 5th.

“I had a great swim, me and Braden tried to get away but he was just too strong over the top of the first climb,” said Griffin. “I thought that if I would have kept him in check I would have been a little bit closer on the downhill because that is where I lose a lot of time.  In the end, I was just stoked to come in third off the bike, I just needed to hold that. My running is coming back and I picked up a few things from the last race in Beaver Creek that I could work on and the half a dozen runs that I did between Beaver Creek and this one on the mountain were all just pure mountain climbing style.”

Elite men’s results

Pos Name, NAT Time Points
1 Josiah Middaugh, USA 2:20:23.57 100
2 Braden Currie, NZL 2:20:23.64 90
3 Leon Griffin, USA 2:24:10 82
4 Felipe Barraza, CHI 2:25:50 75
5 Rom Akerson, CRC 2:25:59 69
6 Karl Shaw, GBR 2:26:00 63
7 Sam Long, USA 2:27:50 58
8 Karsten Madsen, CAN 2:28:28 53
9 Brian Smith, USA 2:32:04 49
10 Matt Lieto, USA 2:33:32 45
11 Alex Modestou, USA 2:33:36 41
12 Branden Rakita, USA 2:36:01 37
13 JP Donovan, USA 2:36:13 34
14 Cody Waite, USA 2:37:39 31
15 Ryan Ignatz, USA 2:37:47 28
Also:  Chris Ganter, Cameron Paul, Alex Martinek, Brad Zoller, Will Kelsay, Joshua Merrick, Jean-Philippe Thibodeau, Ian King, Alex Roberts, Patrick McKeon, Michael Nunez, Eduardo Marcolin, Barret Fishner

SUZIE SNYDER

SNYDER WINS 5TH OF THE YEAR, TOUR TITLE

For Suzie Snyder today’s win put an exclamation point on a superb season that included five wins and the XTERRA Pan America Championship race and XTERRA Pan Am Pro Series titles.

“Amazing day, I had a great swim. I know Julie is a strong swimmer and she does water polo so she is great at sighting so I just kept her on my right where I was breathing to my right, so I could keep her there.  I let her sight and just stayed on her and stayed comfortable because I knew I could ride with her,” said Snyder.  “We were together during the swim and there was another girl, Amanda Felder. I was first on the bike and I felt like I just wanted to go for it but I was trying to be smart and not trying to blow, or go too hard to early but it’s so hard to keep your effort in check and your heart rate in control because your climbing right away intensively and so I was trying to stay smart and relax and I rode really well. Technically smooth, I wasn’t making mistakes, I was just trying to stay calm and relaxed and I just felt good. As I hit the Sardine Peak I felt fine at the start then I started to feel it at the top but I just settled in, pulled back a little bit. So I road really smooth and I was really just feeling confident after the downhill. I came off the bike and as always the first climb friggen sucked, but I just kept thinking that you can lose it here, and you are not going to win by going all out. Someone told me I had a minute and a half, but I really had five, I guess it’s good that I didn’t know that I had five, I was trying not to go too hard, but at the same time I was trying to go hard enough. With a minute and a half you can still get caught if you’re not careful so you can’t settle in too much, but I didn’t want to go crazy, then I started cramping and I was like oh no! about half way I was like okay, you’re half way, you got this, just stay smooth and let it roll downhill then my legs started cramping and I was like NO! don’t eat it, you could lose it right here if you eat it, so I just tried to keep my cadence going and my feet under me and then that last half-mile I just tried to enjoy it.”

Lizzie Orchard, the XTERRA Asia-Pacific Champion, passed Felder and Baker to move into second by the end of the bike and was able to take a couple minutes out of Snyder on the run but it wasn’t enough.

“So I think I heard I was down about five minutes at T2, and I thought ewww, that is a bit of an ask, but you never know, so I went my pace and I think I pulled back a couple of minutes,” said Orchard.  “I am really excited and I am pleased with how good I felt with the cold and the altitude. It was a really, really great day I really enjoyed it. I think there was a little batch that got away on the swim so I could see them ahead of me. I still tried to hang on a little bit but not too much really because I didn’t want to blow at the swim, especially at altitude for me so I was fourth out of water which was good. I jumped into third pretty quick along the lake, then I was pretty cold in the canyon so I’m relieved that I put my thermal on, and there was a heap of people on the course yelling time splits so I knew I was in touch throughout the bike ride and it was really fun. I caught up with Julie Baker at the top of the climb, so I hung back about 20 meters and we did the decent together pretty much, I just faster coming into transition and hit it out on the run.”

Baker, who upset Snyder to win XTERRA Beaver Creek in Colorado back in July, was happy to have a good day on such a big stage and finish third.

“I am super happy with today, I can’t believe I am competing in a pro race and doing so well, it’s just awesome,” said Baker.  “Lizzie and Suzie are amazing and I am super psyched to be up there with them, Suzie had an awesome, awesome swim so I am super psyched for her.”

Maia Ignatz had the fastest run split of the day to finish fourth and Kara LaPoint held on for fifth.

ELITE WOMEN’S RESULTS

Pos Name, NAT Time Points
1 Suzie Snyder, USA 2:51:51 100
2 Lizzie Orchard, NZL 2:54:51 90
3 Julie Baker, USA 2:57:57 82
4 Maia Ignatz, USA 3:00:26 75
5 Kara LaPoint, USA 3:01:43 69
6 Annie Bergen, CAN 3:13:03 63
7 Amanda Felder, USA 3:17:16 58
8 Katharine Carter, CAN 3:17:18 53
9 Debby Sullivan, USA 3:18:00 49
10 Caroline Colonna, USA 3:20:11 45
11 Sarah Graves, USA 3:20:37 41
12 Sabrina Gobbo, BRA 3:24:13 37
13 Lisa Leonard, GBR 3:25:27 34
14 Rebecca Blatt, USA 3:31:57 31

Complete Results

Find pictures, videos, and more stories from XTERRA Pan America Championship at:
https://www.facebook.com/XTERRAplanet

UTAH START

MIDDAUGH, SNYDER WIN XTERRA PAN AMERICAN TOUR

With their respective wins today at Snowbasin Josiah Middaugh and Suzie Snyder locked down the inaugural Pan Am Pro Series.  They also earned the titles of XTERRA USA Champions as the top Americans.
Rom Akerson finished fifth today to secure the second spot in the standings for the men, and Maia Ignatz finished fourth on the day to finish 2nd in the Series.  Here’s a look at the final standings:

2016 XTERRA PAN AM PRO SERIES FINAL STANDINGS                  
FINAL                      
Men     S G S G S S G G G  
PL NAME TOT CRC ARG BRA ALA MOM VIC COL DOM MEX USA
1 Josiah Middaugh, USA 442 67 100 DNS 100 DNS DNS 75 x56 DNS 100
2 Rom Akerson, CRC 391 61 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 61 100 100 69
3 Karsten Madsen, CAN 375 DNS 90 DNS 82 75 75 DNS DNS DNS 53
4 Branden Rakita, USA 314 DNS DNS DNS 75 61 DNS x47 90 51 37
5 Kieran McPherson, NZL 284 DNS DNS DNS 51 DNS 61 x21 82 90 DNF
6 Chris Ganter, USA 169 DNS DNS DNS 63 67 39 DNS DNS DNS DNP
7 Ian King, USA 153 DNS 53 DNS 53 DNS 47 DNP DNS DNS DNP
8 Leon Griffin, USA 151 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 69 DNS DNS 82
9 Sam Long, USA 148 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 90 DNS DNS 58
10 Karl Shaw, GBR 138 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 63
11 Cody Waite, USA 120 DNS DNS DNS 58 DNS DNS 31 DNS DNS 31
12 Mario De Elias, ARG 112 DNS 63 DNS DNS DNS DNS 49 DNS DNS DNS
13 Ryan Ignatz, USA 97 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 69 DNS 28
14 Brian Smith, USA 94 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 45 DNS DNS 49
t15 Mauricio Mendez, MEX 90 DNS DNS DNS 90 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t15 Thomas Spannring, USA 90 DNS DNS DNS 49 DNS DNS 41 DNS DNS DNP
t15 Braden Currie, NZL 90 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 90
18 Ramon Penagos, COL 86 DNS 41 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 45 DNS
t19 Jonatan Morales, ARG 82 DNS 82 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t19 Francisco Serrano, MEX 82 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 82 DNS
t21 Oscar Galindez, ARG 75 DNS 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t21 Albert Soley, ESP 75 DNS DNS 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t21 Ben Hoffman, USA 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 75 DNS DNS DNS
t21 Esteban Rosas, MEX 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 75 DNS
t21 Felipe Barazza, CHI 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 75
26 Lucas Mendez, ARG 69 DNS 69 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t27 Felipe Moletta, BRA 67 DNS DNS 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t27 Paul Tichelaar, CAN 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS
t29 Fabian Roman, PUR 63 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 63 DNS DNS
t29 Leonardo Ramirez, MEX 63 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 63 DNS
31 Diogo Malagon, BRA 61 DNS DNS 61 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t32 Facu Medard, ARG 58 DNS 58 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t32 Greg Bennett, AUS 58 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 58 DNS DNS DNS
t32 Leandro Sanchez, DOM 58 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 58 DNS DNS
t32 Leonardo Saucedo, MEX 58 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 58 DNS
t36 Francois Carloni, FRA 56 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t36 Bruno Silva, BRA 56 DNS DNS 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t38 Alex VanderLinden, CAN 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t38 Brent McMahon, CAN 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS
t40 Brad Zoller, USA 53 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 53 DNS DNS DNP
t40 Eduardo Padilla, MEX 53 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 53 DNS
t42 Federico Venegas, CRC 51 51 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t42 Frederico Zacharias, BRA 51 DNS DNS 51 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t42 Sean Bechtel, USA 51 DNS DNS DNS DNS 51 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t42 Nathan Killam, CAN 51 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 51 DNS DNS DNS DNS
t46 Mauro Ayesa, USA 49 DNS 49 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t46 Anibal Sanchez, MEX 49 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 49 DNS
t48 Greg Schott, USA 47 47 DNS DNS DNF DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t48 Raul Furtado, BRA 47 DNS DNS 47 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t48 Daniel Molnar, USA 47 DNS DNS DNS DNS 47 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t51 Victor Arenas, COL 45 DNS 45 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t51 Michael Nunez, USA 45 DNS DNS DNS 45 DNS DNS DNP DNS DNS DNP
t51 Matt Lieto, USA 45 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 45
t54 Henrique Lugarini, BRA 43 DNS DNS 43 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t54 Brian MacIlvain, USA 43 DNS DNS DNS DNS 43 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t54 Clarke Lind, CAN 43 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 43 DNS DNS DNS DNS
57 Alex Modestou, USA 41 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 41
t58 Eduardo Marcolino, BRA 39 DNS DNS 39 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t58 Adam Morka, CAN 39 DNS DNS DNS DNS 39 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
60 Michi Weiss, AUT 37 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 37 DNS DNS DNS
t61 Rodrigo Altafini, BRA 36 DNS DNS 36 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
t61 Jimmy Archer, USA 36 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 36 DNS DNS DNS DNF
t63 Patrick McKeon, USA 34 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 34 DNS DNS DNP
t63 JP Donovan, USA 34 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 34
65 Stenio Bezerra, BRA 33 DNS DNS 33 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
66 Rogério Paula, BRA 30 DNS DNS 30 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
67 Ramon Bustos, BRA 27 DNS DNS 27 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
68 Cristiam Suzin, BRA 25 DNS DNS 25 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
69 Juscelino Vasco, BRA 23 DNS DNS 23 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
70 Wellington Conceição, BRA 21 DNS DNS 21 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
Women   S G S G S S G G G  
PL NAME TOT CRC ARG BRA ALA MOM VIC COL DOM MEX USA
1 Suzie Snyder, USA 450 DNS DNS DNS 100 75 DNS x67 100 75 100
2 Maia Ignatz, USA 364 DNS DNS DNS 90 61 DNS 82 56 DNS 75
3 Kara Lapoint, USA 347 67 DNS DNS 82 DNS DNS 47 82 DNS 69
4 Myriam Guillot-Boisset, FRA 332 75 100 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 90 67 DNS
5 Sabrina Gobbo, BRA 311 61 DNS 75 69 DNS DNS DNS 69 x47 37
6 Katharine Carter, CAN 283 DNS DNS DNS DNS 56 DNS 75 63 36 53
7 Debby Sullivan, USA 276 DNS DNS DNS 75 51 DNS 58 43 x43 49
8 Caroline Colonna, USA 247 51 DNS DNS 63 43 DNS 45 DNS DNS 45
9 Laura Mira Dias, BRA 241 DNS 82 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS 53 39 DNS
10 Rebecca Blatt, USA 215 47 DNS DNS 53 DNS 47 37 DNS DNS 31
11 Sarah Graves, USA 191 DNS DNS DNS 58 DNS 43 49 DNS DNS 41
12 Julie Baker, USA 182 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 100 DNS DNS 82
13 Fabiola Corona, MEX 172 DNS 90 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 82 DNS
14 Amanda Felder, USA 97 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 39 DNS DNS DNS 58
15 Lizzie Orchard, NZL 90 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 90
16 Lisa Leonard, USA 85 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 51 DNS DNS DNS 34
17 Erika Simon, ARG 75 DNS 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
18 Katie Button, CAN 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS
19 Maria Barrera, MEX 75 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 75 DNS
20 Elizabeth Gruber, USA 69 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 69 DNS DNS DNP
21 Dunia Gomes, MEX 69 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 69 DNS
22 Joanna Brown, CAN 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
23 Zoe Dawson, CAN 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 67 DNS DNS DNS DNS
24 Annie Bergen, CAN 63 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 63
25 Isabella Ribeiro, BRA 61 DNS DNS 61 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
26 Danelle Kabush, CAN 61 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 61 DNS DNS DNS DNS
27 Caitlin Snow, USA 56 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
28 Luisa Saft, BRA 56 DNS DNS 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
29 Jaime Brede, USA 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 56 DNS DNS DNS DNS
30 Mayalen Noriega, ESP 53 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 53 DNS DNS DNS
31 Vanessa Cabrini, BRA 51 DNS DNS 51 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
32 Maggie Rusch, USA 49 DNS DNS DNS 49 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
33 Ana Leidys Arias Macias, CUB 49 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 49 DNS DNS
34 Fernanda Prieto, BRA 47 DNS DNS 47 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
35 Annie-Claude Gaudet, CAN 47 DNS DNS DNS DNS 47 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
36 Brisa Melcop, BRA 43 DNS DNS 43 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
37 Julie Stupp, USA 41 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS 41 DNS DNS DNS
38 Beatriz Granziera, BRA 39 DNS DNS 39 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
39 Melania Giraldi, BRA 36 DNS DNS 36 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS
40 Monalisa Vieira, BRA 33 DNS DNS 33 DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS DNS

Learn more at…

http://www.xterraplanet.com/xterra-pan-am-tour

http://www.xterraplanet.com/races/pro-racing

RYAN, MCCURDY WIN AMATEUR TITLES
Lewis Ryan from Rotorua, New Zealand and Deanna McCurdy from Littleton, Colorado won the overall amateur XTERRA Pan America Championship titles today.  All of the age group winners below (aside from Lewis) won both the XTERRA Pan America and USA Championship crowns.  In the men’s 15-19 division, Bowen Satterthwaite – a 15-year-old from nearby Eden, Utah, won the XTERRA USA Championship crown.

XTERRA PAN AMERICA CHAMPIONS (FEMALE AGE GROUP)  
Division Name Hometown Time
15  – 19 Rachel Anders Sandy, UT 3:15:50
20 – 24 Kaley Rehorn Rio Linda, CA 3:49:52
25 – 29 Janel Klug Avon, CO 3:29:58
30 – 34 Heather Zimchek Olympia, WA 3:20:42
35 – 39 Anne Usher Portland, OR 3:14:54
40 – 44 *Deanna McCurdy Littleton, CO 3:11:52
45 – 49 Laura Morris Costa Mesa, CA 3:32:59
50 – 54 Margo Pitts Raleigh, NC 3:31:20
55 – 59 Tamara Tabeek Ramona, CA 3:36:38
60 – 64 Martha Buttner Boulder, CO 3:46:05
65 – 69 Libby Harrow Fruita, CO 6:23:26
PC Judith Abrahams Anchorage, AK 5:13:25
XTERRA PAN AMERICA CHAMPIONS (MALE AGE GROUP)  
Division Name Hometown Time
15  – 19 *Lewis Ryan Rotorua, New Zealand 2:40:20
20 – 24 Nelson Hegg Boulder, CO 2:43:30
25 – 29 Steve Croucher Randolph, VT 2:51:13
30 – 34 Craig Daugherty Boulder, CO 2:47:31
35 – 39 Nate Youngs Boring, OR 2:44:05
40 – 44 Garren Watkins Boulder, CO 2:45:42
45 – 49 Rife Hilgartner Vail, CO 2:51:23
50 – 54 Darron Cox Toano, VA 3:08:02
55 – 59 Dennis Brinson Carson City, NV 3:11:07
60 – 64 Johnny Davis Boulder, CO 3:17:16
65 – 69 David Rakita Durango, CO 3:51:21
75 – 79 Ronald Hill Hayden, ID 7:17:05
PC Willie Stewart Boise, ID 3:22:27
* TOP AMATEURS

The 2016 XTERRA Pan America Championship and Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Running National Championship is        presented by Paul Mitchell, the Utah Sports Commission, and XTERRA TV at Amazon Video.  Sponsors include PowerBar, Muscle Milk, Outrigger Resorts, the GOAL Foundation, Gatorade Endurance, Utah Media Group, the U.S. Forest Service, XTERRA Wetsuits, Snowbasin Resort, XTERRA Fitness, Optic Nerve Sunglasses, XTERRA Travel, Greenlayer, Hub 801, and XTERRA Boards.
Up Next: XTERRA World Championship (October 23, 2016 / Kapalua, Maui)

2016 XTERRA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP QUALIFIERS

The XTERRA Pan America Championship was the last of 30 events where the fastest amateur athletes from around the world could qualify to race at the 21st annual XTERRA World Championship at Kapalua, Maui on Oct 23.

DATE WORLD TOUR EVENT LOCATION or WINNERS
7-Feb XTERRA Philippines Brad Weiss/Lizzie Orchard
21-Feb XTERRA South Africa Brad Weiss/Flora Duffy
5-Mar XTERRA Motatapu Olly Shaw/Mary Gray
12-Mar XTERRA Saipan Brodie Gardner/Carina Wasle
20-Mar XTERRA Costa Rica Karl Shaw/Myriam Guillot-Boisset
26-Mar XTERRA Argentina Josiah Middaugh/Myriam Guillot
3-Apr XTERRA Malta Roger Serrano/Brigitta Poor
16-Apr XTERRA New Zealand Braden Currie/Lizzie Orchard
17-Apr XTERRA La Reunion Ruben Ruzafa/Carina Wasle
23-Apr XTERRA Asia-Pacific Championship Braden Currie/Lizzie Orchard
7-May XTERRA Asia-Pacific Tour Championship Ben Allen/Jacqui Slack
7-May XTERRA Brazil Albert Soley/Sabrina Gobbo
7-May XTERRA Greece Roger Serrano/Helena Erbenova
14-May XTERRA Tahiti Josiah Middaugh/Lesley Paterson
21-May XTERRA Oak Mountain State Park Josiah Middaugh/Suzie Snyder
21-May XTERRA Portugal Ruben Ruzafa/Helena Erbenova
11-Jun XTERRA Belgium Kris Coddens/Helena Erbenova
25-Jun XTERRA Switzerland Ruben Ruzafa/Michelle Flipo
25-Jun XTERRA Mine over Matter Karsten Madsen/Suzie Snyder
3-Jul XTERRA France Ruben Ruzafa/Lesley Paterson
10-Jul XTERRA Victoria Karsten Madsen/Katie Button
16-Jul XTERRA Beaver Creek Josiah Middaugh/Julie Baker
31-Jul XTERRA Italy Mauricio Mendez/Lesley Paterson
31-Jul XTERRA Dominican Republic Rom Akerson/Suzie Snyder
6-Aug XTERRA Mexico Rom Akerson/Suzie Snyder
7-Aug XTERRA Poland Yeray Luxem/Helena Erbenova
13-Aug XTERRA Sweden Mauricio Mendez/Helena Erbenova
20-Aug XTERRA European Championship Ruben Ruzafa/Michelle Flipo
4-Sep XTERRA Denmark Mauricio Mendez/Brigitta Poor
17-Sep XTERRA USA / Pan Am Championship Josiah Middaugh/Suzie Snyder
23-Oct XTERRA World Championship Kapalua, Maui
mikeadrian_xterra_2015trail-6

Q&A with Trail Runner Penelope Freedman

Penelope Freedman finished 3rd for the women at the 2015 Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Running World Championship. This weekend, she is tackling a challenge that’s a little closer to home at the 2016 Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Running National Championship in Ogden, Utah. We checked in with her before the big race on Sunday.

XTERRA: Why did you want to come race at the Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run Nationals event?

Penelope: I am excited to run this race because of the location and just to be part of another XTERRA event. Every XTERRA event I have participated in has been extremely well organized and has made me feel very welcome. I am also particularly excited about the location. Having been a former competitive snowboarder, I have snowboarded at Snowbasin and spent lots of time snowboarding all over Utah during winter. However, I have never been spent any time in the summer at gorgeous SnowBasin, so it should be interesting to see the mountain from a different perspective.

XT: Do you have any specific goals for the race?

PF: I try not to put any expectations on myself during races because that could set me up for feeling like I failed if I don’t meet those expectations. I train very hard and try and set realistic goals for myself. I would like to be among the top 5 women to finish at XTERRA Trail Run Nationals.

XT: What has your 2016 racing schedule looked like so far?

PF: I have had a very interesting season!….The first part of my race season (May – June) I raced 3 weekends in a row; all in highly competitive races with a strong professional field. I believe pushing myself so hard at the start of the season contributed to a sciatic nerve injury, which I am now recovering from, so that has been a bit stressful.

The last 2 months I spent on the East Coast (for work; as well as 2 weeks coaching at a Nike Trail Running camp in New Hampshire) so I did not get to do as much altitude and mountain running as I would have liked. On the other hand, my coach worked a lot with me on improving my speed during that time so I definitely feel like that has improved vastly. It should be interesting to see how that translates into the XTERRA Nationals Race.

XT: Can you tell us a little about your running achievements?

PF: Some of my results I’m proud of this year include .

3rd overall female in the Pro-division at the Park city Discrete Peak series half marathon.

5th place overall female @ the Go-pro Mountain Games in Vail, Colorado

1st place overall female @ local Howelson Hill 8miler trail run in hometown Steamboat Springs

XT: How will it be to race at elevation?

PF: The elevation is almost Identical to Steamboat so in that regard I have an advantage to competitors traveling from lower elevations. Again, I myself have trained at sea level most of the summer and only been back in Steamboat for a few weeks, so that makes me a little nervous.

XT: What do you do when you aren’t running?

PF: It is extremely expensive living in Steamboat so I, like everyone else, often have two or three jobs. I own a raw, gluten free, vegan, super-food company producing energy bars, vegan cheese, chocolates, etc… and distribute and sell locally. The Company is called Kenchuto Bliss. I also coach the local triathlon team in all their track workouts. In addition I nanny for a 5 year old and family’s hire me out to privately to coach snowboarding during the winter.

XT: What is your favorite thing about trail running?

PF: I love trail running as it is just another excuse to get into the mountains and experience them from a different perspective than snowboarding. Mountains are my number one passion and one of the greatest ways to express my joy for living is through trail running. I love the serenity and silent strength of the mountains and the humbling respect and fragility of life I experience through all the sports I do in the mountains.

XT: What is your game plan for Sunday?

PF: Having never done this course before and having no expectations for the outcome, my main game-plan is to HAVE FUN and make some new friends.

adriana-nieves-the-claw-may-2016

The Off-road to Nationals with Adriana Nieves

By Devin P. Quinn

XTERRA Trail Run Ambassador Adriana Nieves is headed to the Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Championships for her fourth time this year after once again achieving the title of XTERRA Florida Regional Champion. Adriana—mother of four and grandmother of three—has built an impressive racing résumé over the last few years in the Florida and Puerto Rico series, steadily climbing her way up the competitive hierarchy from running newcomer to seasoned champion.

Adriana started running in 2009 just as a way to stay in shape, starting with 5k races and gradually building her abilities and confidence until she set her sights on half-marathon races the next year. The following year yielded a serendipitous introduction that would chart the course of her running career. “My husband was the one that actually discovered the XTERRA races,” recounts Nieves. “He suggested one in Tampa and after the first one in November 2011, I was hooked! I loved running on trails and really enjoyed the atmosphere.” The rest is history. In 2014 Adriana sealed her ascension to the competitive level at a Puerto Rico race, finishing as the 2nd overall female in one of her proudest racing moments.

Despite her level of achievement, the road to Nationals this year was no cakewalk for Nieves. “The competition in the Florida series is pretty stiff,” she explains. “The Tampa area races are challenging which draws a competitive crowd.  There are some amazing athletes racing.” Nevertheless, after a strong performance in Miami, Adriana was reasonably confident in her position. “It’s exciting to see the points build after each race,” she says, and build they did: once again, Adriana emerged victorious from a talented field as Florida Regional Champion.

With the journey complete, Adriana is ready to enjoy the destination. “Coming from the Florida heat, I LOVE the weather in Utah this time of year,” she gushes. “The course at Snowbasin is perfect trail running. Ogden is a lovely town and the race expo is always fun.” Adriana has just one concern: the altitude—which, she admits, “usually kicks my behind.” After suffering headaches and nausea from altitude sickness at her first Nationals, Nieves emphasizes the importance of acclimatization to Snowbasin’s elevation. “To prepare for Nationals, it’s all about getting acclimated to the elevation.  There’s NO WAY to prepare for that in Florida, so what I do is arrive in Ogden on Thursday and use Friday and Saturday to spend time hiking at the much higher elevations.” A savvy tip from a resourceful champion—Nationals newcomers take heed.

Ultimately, Adriana takes an appreciative perspective, advising runners to relax and enjoy themselves. “It’s a beautiful course—when you get to the top, take a moment to look at that view and appreciate the beauty of life and the blessing of good health.”

The Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Championship will take place on September 18th at the Snowbasin Resort in Ogden, Utah.

By Devin P. Quinn
XTERRA Trail Running Intern

Travis Morrison

Q&A with Trail Runner Travis Morrison

With the Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Run National Championship taking place this Sunday at Snowbasin Resort near Ogden, Utah we caught up with one of the contenders Travis Morrison, a 24-year-old from Chicago, Illinois working towards his PhD in mechanical engineering at the University of Utah, who finished 2nd to Patrick Smyth at last year’s Paul Mitchell XTERRA Trail Running National Championship race.  A lot has changed for Morrison since that day, but his joy of running in the mountains is the same.  Here he explains…

XTERRA: Travis, can you bring us up-to-date on your running exploits since last year’s race?

Travis Morrison: Running is going okay. After XTERRA last fall I was working towards an Olympic Trials qualifier, but I got so sick of chasing accolades/times/places/prize money that I took seven months off from training. It’s easy to burn out in this sport post-college without a team because your attention turns towards selfish accolades and accomplishments. I took the time to figure out again why I was running and I if I wanted to continue. Turning to the mountains and looking for adventure made me happy, therefore I began doing monster adventure runs (Uinta Highline, Bryce Traverse, etc…) With this switch back to just having fun with running I’m beginning to love the sport again. The past couple months I have been running a decent amount, and now am toying with the idea of getting back into serious shape for next year.

XT: And school, how is that?

TM: My PhD is going great. I started work last spring in an Environmental Fluid Dynamics lab working with Dr. Eric Pardyjak and Marc Calaf. The research/TA/class schedule keeps me busy, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything at the moment.

XT: How hard is it managing school and running, are you staying healthy?

TM: Healthy? Getting a PhD fortunately doesn’t let you train enough to get hurt 😉

XT: What made you want to do this race again?

TM: I just love racing in the mountains. Times don’t matter and trail races usually attract the kind of people that are just looking for a good time.

XT: Any thoughts on what it would take to beat Patrick Smyth and win this thing?

TM: To beat Smyth? I’m not really sure what it would take to beat him, but as you can probably predict with my previous answers, I’m not really interested in caring all that much either. Running is sport that is about self-mastery, and self-discovery. If you focus on what other people are doing or are caught up about beating someone you’re running for the wrong reasons. 99% of runners are not going to make a living off of their talents, so might as well have fun in the process and let the outcome take care of itself.

XT: Any advice for racers coming from sea-level on dealing with altitude here in Utah?

TM: I’m from Chicago myself and went back and forth between altitude and flatland all through college. My approach to the matter is simple … it is what it is. The science is there, and fact is, there’s less oxygen in the air at higher altitudes, so you’re going to run slower. But it is out of your control. Give the best effort that you can, just like you would at sea level. Focusing on the uncontrollables just adds prerace stress and can hurt your performance.

XT: Any spots or climbs on the course that require special attention?

TM: If I remember correctly, there’s a couple gnarly little climbs. The second one in particular I remember being tough. With that said, the whole course is runnable, super smooth and flowy, which makes it super-fast and fun.

XT: Why do you like about trail running?

TM: Trail running is great because times do not matter. No course has equal climbs, technical sections, down hills, turns, or whatever you can think that makes this course unique. Therefore, it’s a lot easier to have no expectations, have fun and see what happens. Also, grinding it out with great views is always better than trying to pound out steady 5-minute miles on the Jordan river trail.

XT: Do you miss those Chicago winters?

TM: Definitely not. The warm dry winters here in the valley are great for training.  It’s also great if you love to ski. Never forget the highest VO2 maxes ever recorded come from those strong nordic skiers!

Thanks for the opportunity and let me know if Xterra would be able to help accommodate me!